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02.07.2022 | Tracker

Product Launch Tracker: HCPs celebrate 5th agnostic approval in Cancer alongside other approvals

By Paul Cranston and Tomi Shobande

Every month, CREATION.co’s tracking updates bring you the latest insights from the conversation of healthcare professionals (HCPs) across the globe discussing product launches. Discover which new drug approvals HCPs are talking about, what they think about them, and which online sources they are using to inform their opinions and conversations in CREATION.co’s latest tracking update.

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Throughout June 2022 we tracked the global conversations of 2,279 HCPs who posted 3,369 English-language Twitter posts about the launches and approvals of new products.

A graph showing HCP mentions of product launches on Twitter in June 2022

Over the course of the month of June, there were several product approvals that sparked discussion from HCPs online, with notable excitement being found for the FDA’s approval of Novartis’ 5th agnostic treatment in cancer, which can be used to treat all solid tumours with a BRAF V600E mutation. Additionally, HCPs were also positive about approvals in amyloidosis, alopecia, and Crohn’s disease, however, opinions were more divided on the FDA’s decision to approve the Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna COVID-19 vaccines in children aged 6 months and older.

The FDA’s decision to approve the combination of two Novartis products, Tafinlar (dabrafenib) and Mekinist (trametinib), for the treatment of patients with unresectable or metastatic solid tumours with BRAF V600E mutation, was met with considerable enthusiasm from HCPs. There was particular mention of the approval being agnostic – meaning that the therapy is approved to treat cancer based on the cancer’s genetic and molecular features without regard to the cancer type or where the cancer started in the body. Many HCPs took to sharing the news on social media, celebrating the approval as great news for patients and highlighting the ORR data in the study the approval was based on.

HCPs also shared the approval of Alnylam pharmaceuticals’ Amvuttra (vutrisiran) for the treatment of the polyneuropathy of hereditary transthyretin-mediated amyloidosis (hATTR) in adults. hATTR amyloidosis is a rare, inherited, rapidly progressive, and fatal disease with debilitating polyneuropathy manifestations, for which there are few treatment options. As such, HCPs were positive about the news and pleased to have more options to treat the condition.

Another approval which caught HCPs attention in June was Lily and Incyte’s Olumiant (baricitinib), the first and only approved systematic medicine for adults with severe alopecia areata, a disorder that often appears as patchy baldness and affects more than 300,000 people in the US each year. HCPs were excited about the novel treatment that could be revolutionary in treating hair loss

Additionally, while the level of HCP conversation around approvals in the COVID-19 space fell considerably in June, some HCPs still discussed the FDA’s authorisation of Moderna and Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 Vaccines for children down to 6 months of age. HCPs shared mixed views regarding the announcement, some were excited while others questioned the data and the beneficial effect for children. 

Finally, HCPs also discussed the FDAs approval of Skyrizi (risankizumab-rzaa) for the treatment of adults with moderately to severely active Crohn’s disease . Skyrizi is part of a collaboration between Boehringer Ingelheim and AbbVie, with AbbVie leading development and commercialisation of Skyrizi globally.

The three most shared links from HCPs discussing product launches in May were:

Each month, CREATION.co tracks the HCP conversation relating to new product launches.

You can keep up to date with this and a variety of other topics including virtual congress, healthcare changes since the pandemic, product development and therapy area specific insights within the Tracking section of CREATION Knowledge, or sign up to receive our monthly eJournal with all of our latest HCP insights. 

To stay up to date, you can sign up to CREATION.co’s monthly eJournal

Methodology

  • Using CREATION Pinpoint® the English-language Twitter conversations of HCPs globally discussing new pharmaceutical product launches and drug approvals between 1 June and 30 June 2022 were analysed in order to discover which new product launches HCPs are discussing as well as #WhatHCPsThink.
  • Mentions of drug approvals by the FDA, EMA, NICE, and CHMP were included in the data, as well as mentions of ‘drug approval’ by HCPs in their Twitter conversations.
  • Between 1 June and 30 June 2022, there were 3,369 HCP mentions of new pharmaceutical product launches and drug approvals from 2,279 unique HCP authors from around the world.

View the latest and archived trackers here

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Meet the Authors

Paul Cranston

Paul analyses the online conversations of HCPs to provide insights for pharmaceutical companies about what HCPs think. With a background in international development, he is passionate about using data to reveal the unmet needs in healthcare communities.

In his free time, Paul can often be found either writing songs on his guitar or kicking a ball around on a football field.

Tomi Shobande

Tomi is passionate about building relationships with clients and helping them attain their business goals and objectives. With a background in law, international development and human rights, she is keen on bringing about a positive difference around healthcare inequities and shaping health outcomes for all groups.

Tomi enjoys spending good quality time with friends and family. She also is passionate about travel and learning different cultures and histories along the way.

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